FG raises salaries of military, police, others

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The Federal Government has approved a 25 to 35 per cent increase in the salary structures of police officers, the armed forces, public servants, among others.

It announced this on Tuesday through the National Salaries, Incomes and Wages Commission, stating that the salary raise takes effect from January 1, 2024.

The NSIWC, in a statement issued by its Head of Press, Emmanuel Njoku, said the approved increase of between 25 and 35 per cent in salary was for civil servants on the remaining six consolidated salary structures.

The commission said, “The Federal Government has approved an increase of between 25 per cent and 35 per cent in salary for civil servants on the remaining six consolidated salary structures.”

It outlined the structures to include the “Consolidated Public Service Salary Structure, Consolidated Research and Allied Institutions Salary Structure Consolidated Police Salary Structure, Consolidated Para-military Salary Structure, Consolidated Intelligence Community Salary Structure, and Consolidated Armed Forces Salary Structure.”

Recall that those in the tertiary education and health sectors had already received their increases, which involved Consolidated University Academic Salary Structure, and Consolidated Tertiary Institutions Salary Structure for Universities.

For polytechnics and colleges of education, it involved the Consolidated Polytechnics and Colleges of Education Academic Staff Salary Structure, and Consolidated Tertiary Educational Institutions Salary Structure.

The health sector also benefitted through the Consolidated Medical Salary Structure and Consolidated Health Sector Salary Structure.

Njoku said the latest increases take effect from January 1, 2024.

“In line with the provisions of Section 173(3) of the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (as amended), the Federal Government has also approved increases in pension of between 20 per cent and 28 per cent for pensioners on the Defined Benefits Scheme in respect of the above-mentioned six consolidated salary structures with effect from January 1, 2024,” the NSIWC stated.

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Prior to 2024, Nigerian civil servants had been advocating for a salary raise. Negotiations included talks of a 40 per cent increase, but an agreement was reached for a range of increases between 25 per cent and 35 per cent to be implemented in January 2024. This increase applies to federal civil servants under various consolidated salary structures.

Also, Nigerian labour unions have been pushing for a significant increase in the minimum wage of workers across the country.

The Nigeria Labour Congress had initially proposed N615,000 per month, while the Trade Union Congress suggested figures ranging from N447,000 to N850,000 depending on the region.

The unions argue the current minimum wage (which expired in April 2024 is insufficient due to rising inflation and the high cost of living.

Talks are ongoing, and the unions have revised their demands downwards. NLC now seeks around N500,000 while considering proposals from their state chapters.

Negotiations are influenced by recent events like the electricity tariff hike, making unions argue for a higher raise. A final decision is expected by May 1, 2024 (May Day).

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